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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN2 18
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
the world's first true world war. his attack on the french in the western pennsylvania wilderness grew into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britai
in the wilderness represent a majority of rank-and-file voters. the first that i alluded to that many on the right don't understand that properly understood gay-rights are compatible with fundamental principles and the essence of the libertarian philosophy is one of louis and let live people are concerned with unalienable rights. the government does that give those rights depended on your religion, economic class, a gender, or theoretically your sexual orientation. that is the way it is supposed to be. some libertarians already get that who have a special obligation to te
in the kentucky wilderness on sunday, february 12, he entered a world as harsh and primitive as if he had been born a thousand years earlier. there was no doctor. simply giving birth put his mother's life in mortal danger. the only help available with the old granny women as they called her, who was summoned from miles away. a newborn baby was washed up in water and carried up a hill from a chirping spring, wrapped in animal fur and laid on a bed of dried up corn husks on a mud floor. now in later years, lincoln would allow his political supporters to glamorize his frontier roots. they made him out to be a sort of backless superman, but the log cabin had no romance for him. lincoln knew first-hand the dead-end life of an undeveloped economy. all the hardship and sorrow of what was called vintage living. his strongest boyhood memories were of death and near-death. the time he almost drowned as a boy. the time he was knocked cold by a kicking horse. his younger brother, his mother and his best friend in the world. this boy blessed with a naturally brilliant mind felt like an alien on a hostile p
was in the wilderness. jimmy carter occupied the white house and the house and senate were safely democrat hands. with the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took control of the white house and the senate. but in the house where newt gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman whose author was only steps away from newt's. i can history of our representatives like newt, the minority was often a lonely place. the republicans had held the majority there since 1954 and there was not a soul alive who could ever imagine the republican majority again. except for newt. there's no seniority, but a tireless work ethic, dedication and mind filled with ideas. it is newt gingrich or sat in the back benches of congress and methodically devised a strategy over several years to make the republican party party of ideas once again. in this newt who devised the famous contract with america. a plan that gave republicans more to run against in historic 1994 elections. he gives them something to run for. in this newt to rally the faithful behin
was in wilderness. jimmy carter occupied the white house and both the house and senate were safefully democrat hands. the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took control bows the white house and the senate. in the house, where gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman who had an office steps away from newt's. can assure you for representatives like newt, the minority was off in a lonely place. the republicans hasn't held a majority there since 1956. there was not a soul alive that could imagine a republican majority again. oh. except for newt. [laughter] with no seniority, but a tireless work ethic, a vision, and a mind filled with idea, it was newt gingrich who sat in the back bench of congress and meth devised a -- once again. it was gingrich that devised the famous contract with america. the plan that gave republicans more than something to run against in the historic 1994 election. he gave them something to run for. it was gingrich who rallied the faithful behind the ideas and took back the house after forty years in the
, but not these particular people. and, in fact, the gossip was much wilder than the reality. he had a--it was said that he built the lying-in hospital in new york to take care of all the pregnancies that he was responsible. c-span: lying-in? >> guest: lying-in is a maternity hospital. we don't use that term anymore, although in boston it's still called the boston lying-in. he did actually build that hospital, but there was a less-lurid explanation. his best friend and physician was a man named james w. markoe, who was an obstetrician, and he wanted to build a hospital that would give up-to-date, first-class care to poor women who couldn't afford it. and morgan gave them $1 million to build the hospital and gave $100,000 to it for the rest of his life, which is not what we think of about j.p. morgan, that he was helping poor women have children under the best possible circumstances. c-span: did you spend 15 years on this one subject? >> guest: on j. p. morgan? c-span: yes. c-span: yes. >> guest: yes. but it isn't one subject, it's about 30. c-span: but this one book. >> guest: yes, this one book took me 15
the country, so he began preaching about a sense of new national peril as a voice in the wilderness. most of his peers at the top of what became the leader party opposed his new militarism, especially israel's second prime minister. and he was a man who most americans had not heard of, and he believed passionately that israel's security could only be assured through a strategy of peaceful integration which required compromise and accommodation with the arabs. nasser, the egyptian military dictator who had taken over in 1952, carried on a secret correspondence with him facilitated by our central intelligence agency whose officers believed that israel and egypt could come to terms. yet at the time, the policies based on diplomacy, negotiation, integration was anathema to ben-gurion. where ben-gurion said we should get ready for war as a nation, his cabinet, however, said no. its members were listening to sharon who was listening to president eisenhower and to john foster dulles about a new world order of the u.n. charter, about the strategic importance of peace and of conflict resolution by
to hold on a little wilder. and we probably wouldn't mind being in our 20s starting over, because that generation of writers, students of mine, will be in on the ground floor of whatever new model is being built now. it will quickly announce and feel unnatural to them. what we would've so much want to be is in her 40s and having fully to adapt to the system that we never anticipated when starting out. the changes over the last 15 years have the sense that we are just at the beginning of them and not all of the signs seem very friendly to me. simon & schuster, which not long ago was getting into video but combinations, "vooks." it sounds at a a much more developed version of it. well, along with that, just edit a simon & schuster announced that it was aligning itself with the self-publishing venture. i would suggest that no publishing house, no matter how dire the times and no matter how much amazon would like to see all editors and all agents go way, should be part of this. because it brings us one step closer to a world without editors. what would be the world with many more elec
, his party, like the republican party today, was in the wilderness. the jimmy carter occupied the white house, and both the house and senate were safely in democratic hands. but with the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took both the house and the senate. but in the house, where newt gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. now, i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman's office who was only steps away from newt, and i can assure you for representatives like newt, the minority was often a lonely place. the republicans had not held the majority there since 1954, and it was not a soul alive who could ever imagine a republican majority again. oh, except for newt. with no seniority but a tireless work ethic, a vision and a mind filled with ideas, it was newt gingrich who sat in the back benches of congress and methodically devise a strategy over several years to make the republican party a party of ideas once again. it was newt edifies the famous contract with america. plan to give republicans more than something to run against the historic 1944 election
. it added wilderness protection to over 2 million acres, it designates 1,100 miles of wild and scenic rivers, added more than 2,800 miles to the national trail system, and i was proud to be part of the effort to enact that legislation. finally, i'll make a few comments on the way that we in the congress conduct our own business. any fair assessment has to conclude that in this area we have lost ground in the last two decades. public opinion of the performance of congress is at an all-time low, and it is not hard to see why. i'll mention three obvious wears in which the functioning of congress has worsened. first is the willingness of some in congress to shut down the government. in 1995 we saw the leadership of the house of representatives demonstrate that they considered refusing to fund the government as an acceptable bargaining ploy in that efforts to prevail in disputes with president clinton and democrats on spending issues. since 1995, that think th threao withhold appropriations has been made several more times, and as we saw then, shuttlin shutting e government is harmful, wasteful t
liberalism of american -- [inaudible] like the pioneers conquering the american wilderness, israel had made the desert bloom, was the only democracy in the middle east. it was t light unto the nations. it was home to the microutopia of the -- [inaudible] in the past three years -- excuse me, in the past three decades, however, the uplifting image of israel has withered and so has american jewish support for israel. it is not so much that israel has changed, although it has changed mostly if not entirely for the worse, rather it's that american jews who are terate know much more. indeed, at this point they know too much. american jews can noonger reconc theirlil beliefs with, t borrow a phrase from the soviet era, rarely existing zionism. it can be said until quite recently most scholarship on israel read like "exodus" with footnotes. to take one example, it was a truism that all the wars israel fought were in self-defense. but current scholarship reveals a very different picture. in his monumental study, "defending the holyland, the author who was formerly the head of strategic studies at t
was country has not had before. let me mention an even wilder category, and i will divide these into three legal lifestyle and professional categories. many of us focus on health care economics, we talk about hair rate disclosure. the medicare data is accessible. it is kind of shocking that for years we didn't even really understand how dialysis company, major industries like that made money. we need to amend the federal patent law to amend fraud. the federal government is the fastest player in the country and that's great, but it also leads to fraudulent payments sometimes. we probably need to update the definition of disability. it hasn't been updated since the 1950s. also, cost reimbursement as a means to getting things under control. it is amazing how almost every state enjoys the medicaid system, not to medicaid beneficiaries, but to dauphin. the federal employees health benefits program. the competition was held. how many people know that blue cross blue shield has gotten a $3 billion from the government every year since 1986? the blues and only the blues. how is this fair? other thi
the wilderness from coast to coast, in recent decades the u.s. has systematically failed to invest in the modern rail system. i thank president obama for making high-speed rail a priority. instead of developing energy efficient mass transit, we have allowed our rail system to deteriorate. we're not just lagging, we're not even trying to innovate. that's just not the american way. as a resident of knight, i fully understand the value of access to high-speed rail service along the southeast corridor. it is the busiest rail line in the united states, and it is the only amtrak segment that runs an operating surplus. it is making a profit. of all the places in our nation high-speed rail makes most sense along the northeast corridor which features the most congested road, the densest population and the most interconnected cities, and it had the ridership to make a profit for the investment in this rail system. from washington to boston, the amtrak stations are located right in the city centers making them more accessible to business travelers and the airports. the northeast region also has the densest
and the wilderness. you talk about antietam and you talk about shiloh, manassas, all these battles people defending what they think, a way of life for slavery or what have you, all of that, all that bloodshed settle this contradiction. and we won. we have our country. and i like to go to gettysburg to say to my clerks, do we deserve this? do we deserve the sacrifice for the country that we have and are we living up to that? are we doing our part? >> just go anyplace. think of the people at the battle of the bulge or think of them at you know, during any war and just ask yourself, you know, let's assume without debating whether you should have had this, that, this war that, we have done our part and the thing i was told, was going to be a priest. that was really the only sort of goal that i had. what is a priest? you are called to do something. every ex-seminarian it's all nice like -- your call now is to do your part. to be able to earn the right to be here. >> you can mention in your book very prominently on the first page in the last page and i will mention it again, god. the declaration of indep
about the carnage and the lives lost, the great battle before in fredericksburg and the wilderness. you talk about antietam and you talk about shiloh, manassas, all these battles people defending what they think, a way of life for slavery or what have you, all of that, all that bloodshed settle this contradiction. and we won. we have our country. and i like to go to gettysburg to say to my clerks, do we deserve this? do we deserve the sacrifice for the country that we have and are we living up to that? are we doing our part? >> just go anyplace. think of the people at the battle of the bulge or think of them at you know, during any war and just ask yourself, you know, let's assume without debating whether you should have had this, that, this war that, we have done our part and the thing i was told, was going to be a priest. that was really the only sort of goal that i had. what is a priest? you are called to do something. every ex-seminarian it's all nice like -- your call now is to do your part. to be able to earn the right to be here. >> you can mention in your book very prominently o
in nine states as protected wilderness, including a 5,300 acre national monument to protect fossils located north of las cru kr*e s, new mexico. -- i can say senator bingaman is among the greatest who set aside public land for future generations, people like roosevelt and others. senator bingaman takes his rightful place there. mr. president, for the last three decades in this body senator bingaman has been a tireless advocate for the people of new mexico, a determined champion for the future of clean and renewable energy for the united states. he's been an outstanding senator, a wonderful friend. i join with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle in wishing jeff and ann the very best in the years ahead. mr. president, with that, i yield the floor. and i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: a senator: ask the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. gillibrand: i rise today to urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support our efforts to come to the relief of millions of
should return to play. >> thank you, tom for wilderness foreign and obviously to bob who is that the science and discussion forward dramatically because one of the things we all know is we can't not do nothing or anything. see how many negatives are put in there to make a positive. we have to do something. as a clinician that these kids and families and our clinics in seeing the major education deficit on the fields today in all sports frankly, but also seeing the outcomes. some of the things that raise talking about in terms of understanding forces is really important and we just completed some work in developing measures they are using so we can understand their cognitive symptom kinds of effects of these to kids. i think that's very, very important outcome to what we need to link up with the games. from the perspective -- actually was at the aspen institute this summer, where u.s. nabobs question about, should we be eliminating football -- tackling a football before the age of 14. at that point i couldn't speak, although we did speak that night. one of the things i sai
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)